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[H] +300 Steam Games (Special discount) [W] Paypal (from 0.75$ each)

   
One free game of your choice for each purchase (only first list games)
      REP
Steam profile
IGSRep +82 trades confirmed
SGS Flair +214 trades confirmed
GameTradeREP +24 trades confirmed
       
Payment through Paypal (USD) using Good & Services option. Not accepting other type of payment (bitcoin, Venmo, etc). If you want to pay using F&F option fees are on your side. (I'm from EU).
   
Recently added. New games weekly Press Ctrl + F to search games in the list
   
   
   
0.75$ (OFFER 4x2: choose 4 games and pay only 2.5$ fees included)
   
3$ (OFFER:Take 2 games for only 4.75$ instead of 6$)
   
4.5$ (OFFER:Take 2 games for only 7$ instead of 9$)
   
submitted by SparkyNest to SteamGameSwap [link] [comments]

[H] +300 Steam Games (Special discount) [W] Paypal (from 0.75$ each)

   
One free game of your choice for each purchase (only first list games)
      REP
Steam profile
IGSRep +82 trades confirmed
SGS Flair +215 trades confirmed
GameTradeREP +24 trades confirmed
       
Payment through Paypal (USD) using Good & Services option. Not accepting other type of payment (bitcoin, Venmo, etc). If you want to pay using F&F option fees are on your side. (I'm from EU).
   
Recently added. New games weekly Press Ctrl + F to search games in the list
   
   
   
0.75$ (OFFER 4x2: choose 4 games and pay only 2.5$ fees included)
   
3$ (OFFER:Take 2 games for only 4.75$ instead of 6$)
   
4.5$ (OFFER:Take 2 games for only 7$ instead of 9$)
   
submitted by SparkyNest to SteamGameSwap [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://www.reddit.com/Scams/comments/jij7zf/the_blackmail_email_scam_part_6/
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Cartel scam
You will be threatened by scammers who claim to be affiliated with a cartel. They may send you gory pictures and threaten your life and the lives of your family. Usually the victim will have attempted to contact an escort prior to the scam, but sometimes the scammers target people randomly. If you are targeted by a cartel scam all you need to do is ignore the scammers as their threats are clearly empty.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
Craigslist Carfax/vehicle history scam
You'll encounter a scammer on Craigslist who wants to buy the vehicle you have listed, but they will ask for a VIN report from a random site that they have created and they will expect you to pay for it.
Double dip/recovery scammers
This is a scam aimed at people who have already fallen for a scam previously. Scammers will reach out to the victim and claim to be able to help the victim recover funds they lost in the scam.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam part 5: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5/
PSA: you did not win a giftcard: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/fffmle/psa_you_did_not_win_a_gift_card/
Sugar scams
Sugar scammers operate all over the internet and usually come in two varieties: advance-fee scams where the scammer will ask for a payment from you before sending you lots of money, and fake check style scams where the scammer will either pull a classic fake check scam, or will do a "bill pay" style scam that involves them paying your bills, or them giving you banking information to pay your bills. If you encounter these scammers, report their accounts and move on.
Google Hangouts
Google Hangouts is a messaging platform used extensively by all kinds of scammers. If you are talking with someone online and they want you to switch to Hangouts, they are likely a scammer and you should proceed with caution.
Publishers Clearing House scams
PCH scams are often advance-fee scams, where you will be promised lots of money after you make an initial payment. You will never need to pay if you win money from the real PCH.
Pet scams
You are looking for a specific breed of puppy, bird, or other pet. You come across a nice-looking website that claims to be breeding them and has some available right now - they may even be on sale! The breeders are not local to your area (and may not even list a physical location) but they assure you they can safely ship the pet to you after a deposit or full payment. If you go through with the payment, you will likely be contacted by the "shipper" who will inform you about an unexpected shipping/customs/processing fee required to deliver your new pet. But there was never any pet, both the "breeder" and the "shipper" are scammers, typically operating out of Africa. These sites are rampant and account for a large percentage of online pet seller websites - they typically have a similar layout/template (screenshot - example)
If you are considering buying a pet online, some easy things to check are: (1) The registration date of the domain (if it was created recently it is likely a scam website) (2) Reverse image search the pictures of available pets - you will usually find other scam websites using the same photos. (3) Copy a sentence/section of the text from the "about us" page and put it into google (in quotes) - these scammers often copy large parts of their website's text from other places. (4) Search for the domain name and look for entries on petscams.com or other scam-tracking sites. (5) Strongly consider buying/adopting your pet from a local shelter or breeder where you can see the animal in person before putting any money down.
Thanks to djscsi for this entry.
Fake shipping company scams
These scams usually start when you try to buy something illegal online. You will be scammed for the initial payment, and then you will receive an email from the fake shipping company telling you that you need to pay them some sort of fee or bribe. If you pay this, they will keep trying to scam you with increasingly absurd stories until you stop paying, at which point they will blackmail you. If you are involved in this scam, all you can do is ignore the scammers and move on, and try to dispute your payments if possible.
Chinese Upwork scam
Someone will ask you to create an Upwork or other freelancer site account for them and will offer money in return. You will not be paid, and they want to use the accounts to scam people.
Quickbooks invoice scam
This is a fake check style scam that takes advantage of Quickbooks.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Digit wallet scam
A variation of the fake check scam, the scammer sends you money through a digital wallet (i.e. Venmo, Apple Pay, Zelle, Cash App) along with a message claiming they've sent the money to the wrong person and a request to send the money back. Customer service for these digital wallets may even suggest that you send the money back. However, the money sent is from a stolen credit card and will be removed from your account after a few days. Your transfer is not reversed since it came from your own funds.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

How I Got a Deep 70% Discount on the Newly Launched Sonos Five

I posted this back in June 2020 on Medium, but thought I'd re-post here as well in case it's helpful!
None of this is groundbreaking, just wanted to share the combo of things I did (discount codes, selling old speakers, etc.) to off-set the Sonos 5 purchase!
Also, I'm new to the Reddit community, this is my first post :)

Here's the original article:

A huge new update was just released to usher in the next generation of Sonos devices. The new ’S2’ update is both a new app and a new operating system, opening up a new world of features like hi-res audio, a subtle new look, and other much-awaited goodies.
But the update also means that older Sonos devices are no longer supported in the new ecosystem. I owned one of these dinosaurs - the flagship model 1st generation Play: 5 originally released in 2009.
This is how I upgraded to the newly launched Play Five - originally priced at $499 - for a total purchase price of $138 bought directly from Sonos. That’s a 70% savings!

The Sonos Trade Up Program
So you paid hundreds or even thousands of dollars for your home audio system, only to find that your devices will no longer be supported in the bright new Sonos future ahead.
Enter the Trade Up program. Sonos encourages its loyal customers to upgrade their eligible devices by giving them a nice 30% discount on new devices purchased directly on sonos.com or through authorized retailers.
The process is so quick and easy, I didn’t even realize what I had done until after I got the deal.
First, sign in to your account on sonos.com. Once logged in, you should then see a “Trade Up” page where you can get a list of all the devices in your current system that are eligible for the program. I own a Play: 1, a One, a Beam, but only my Play: 5 was eligible for the Trade Up program. Once you choose your eligible device and confirm, you instantly get the 30% off discount in your account, and can verify that you got it by going to the “Offers” page. You don’t even have to enter a promo code. As long as you’re logged in, your next order gets the discount.
The 30% discount never expires and can be used on one full-priced device.
Sonos also provides some info on how to recycle your old device so that it doesn’t go to a landfill. How thoughtful and sustainable.
But the Trade Up program wasn’t always as eco-friendly. Sonos got quite a bit of bad press back in October 2019 for the controversial “Recycle Mode” that bricked devices that were redeemed for discounts using the Trade Up program. After getting their 30% Trade Up discount, customers used to get a 21-day countdown before the old device goes into Recycle Mode, which wiped out all the data then permanently bricked the device. This was seen as an environmentally unfriendly abuse of hardware, most of which was still functioning perfectly even though they wouldn’t be getting feature updates. Good move on Sonos to get rid of this unnecessary bricking.
At the time of this writing, in addition to the Play: 5, other products eligible for the Trade Up program include Zone Players, along with Connect and Connect:Amp devices manufactured between 2011 and 2015.
After the 30% Trade Up discount, a brand new Play Five would cost $349 directly from sonos.com.
If 30% off is a good enough deal for you, high five and congrats on getting an awesome discount, you can stop reading here. The rest is how I got my purchase price down to more than 70% off.

My Price Arbitrage Hack
If you don’t have a legacy device, buy one on eBay! This may seem counterintuitive, but you could actually save money by buying a legacy device - as long as the 30% discount you would get is more than what you paid for the legacy speaker.
Please double, triple, quadruple check that the device you’re buying on eBay (or other marketplaces) is on the list of eligible devices for the Trade Up program.
Here’s how stumbled upon this great hack.
I bought my Play: 5 on eBay only a couple of months ago for $125 - inclusive of taxes and shipping - not even intending to trade it up. I actually didn’t even know about the Trade Up program when I made the purchase, and just needed a way to connect my turntable to my Sonos system using the Play: 5’s line-in. The unit I ended up buying looked like it had seen better days - black skid marks, surface scratches, and even a pretty large piece of plastic missing from the top edge. But it was functioning perfectly and allowed me to finally play my vinyl collection through Sonos speakers around my apartment.
Fast forward 2 months later - I was initially bummed that my eBay purchase was on the list of legacy devices that wouldn’t be supported by the ‘S2’ update. After some creative math, my frustration was quickly replaced by joy when I found out the 30% I’d get off a new Play Five would be more than the $125 I paid for my old speakers.

Get a Bundle
Sometimes you have to spend more money to save even more money. Here’s how I stretched my Trade Up discount to get an even better deal on my Play Five.
I ended up using my 30% Trade Up discount on not one, but two Play Fives with the Two Room Pro Set, for a total of $699 directly from sonos.com.
I live in a 1-bedroom apartment and don’t want my neighbors to hate me, so I planned on keeping only one device. Why did I buy the bundle then? Because I knew I could sell the second unit for more than the $349 that I paid, while still giving the buyer a good discount off a newly launched product.
There was also zero risk on my end thanks to the 45-day Return Policy. If I wasn’t able to sell the second unit, I could easily submit a return and get my money back.
As soon as I placed the order, I posted a brand new white Play Five on the Reddit buy/sell/trade thread for $425. This would get the buyer $75 a brand new Play Five, pretty nifty as discounts are unheard of for newly launched products.
Unfortunately the Play Fives were backordered, so I wasn’t able to get my order until almost two weeks later. But being on backorder gave me some insight that there was more than enough demand for the product - great news for someone trying to sell one!
Within minutes of receiving my package, I quickly posted it on Mercari and Facebook Marketplace, and almost instantly sold it. Now I’m wondering if I could’ve listed it a little higher!
I got my asking price of $425, bringing the purchase price of the Five I kept to $274 - that’s 45% off the original price!

Sell Redundant Units
If you’re perfectly happy with almost half off the $499 list price, then stop here, and go place your order already! The next tip might take a little more effort, but it’s what got me down to an out of pocket cost of $138 for the newly launched Fives.
Here it is - I sold the old Play: 5 for $85. Yes, the same unit that Sonos gave me a 30% Trade Up discount on. This sounded shady to me too, so I checked. The Verge mentioned it as an option. I reached out to Sonos, but haven’t gotten a reply. https://www.theverge.com/2019/12/30/21042871/sonos-recycle-mode-trade-up-program-controversy
I posted it on Mercari for $95, it sold for the asking price within 30 minutes, and the buyer even paid for shipping. Now I’m thinking again, could I have listed it for higher?
Mercari takes a 10% cut, so that takes my earnings down to $85.50, and bringing my Play Five purchase price down to $213. Well, technically $213.50, but I’ll give you the fifty cents back if it can cut back on my typing.
I found the final $75 difference by selling an older Play: 1 that would’ve been in the same space as my new Play Five. Once again, I don’t want my neighbors to hate me. Now, I get that not everyone will have an extra Sonos speaker laying around to sell, but I did, so I’m counting it in my total.
With the $75 earnings from my old Play: 1, my final purchase price for the freshly launched brand new Play Five is $138.

Get it Certified Refurbished
Want a quicker and easer way to get a discount on Sonos products directly from sonos.com? Buy refurbished.
This is actually where I got the Play: 1 that I told you about earlier. I bought it for $99 and sold it for $75 two years later, proving how much stored value Sonos products have. It may even more stable than Bitcoin.
Right now there aren’t too many deals to snag in the Refurbished section, but keep checking back as they update it pretty regularly.

Conclusion
It takes a little bit of pre-planning and patience, but by taking advantage of Sonos offers along with creative arbitrage, you can get 72% off a brand new newly launched product directly from the manufacturer.
submitted by yikessilly to sonos [link] [comments]

Bob The Magic Custodian



Summary: Everyone knows that when you give your assets to someone else, they always keep them safe. If this is true for individuals, it is certainly true for businesses.
Custodians always tell the truth and manage funds properly. They won't have any interest in taking the assets as an exchange operator would. Auditors tell the truth and can't be misled. That's because organizations that are regulated are incapable of lying and don't make mistakes.

First, some background. Here is a summary of how custodians make us more secure:

Previously, we might give Alice our crypto assets to hold. There were risks:

But "no worries", Alice has a custodian named Bob. Bob is dressed in a nice suit. He knows some politicians. And he drives a Porsche. "So you have nothing to worry about!". And look at all the benefits we get:
See - all problems are solved! All we have to worry about now is:
It's pretty simple. Before we had to trust Alice. Now we only have to trust Alice, Bob, and all the ways in which they communicate. Just think of how much more secure we are!

"On top of that", Bob assures us, "we're using a special wallet structure". Bob shows Alice a diagram. "We've broken the balance up and store it in lots of smaller wallets. That way", he assures her, "a thief can't take it all at once". And he points to a historic case where a large sum was taken "because it was stored in a single wallet... how stupid".
"Very early on, we used to have all the crypto in one wallet", he said, "and then one Christmas a hacker came and took it all. We call him the Grinch. Now we individually wrap each crypto and stick it under a binary search tree. The Grinch has never been back since."

"As well", Bob continues, "even if someone were to get in, we've got insurance. It covers all thefts and even coercion, collusion, and misplaced keys - only subject to the policy terms and conditions." And with that, he pulls out a phone-book sized contract and slams it on the desk with a thud. "Yep", he continues, "we're paying top dollar for one of the best policies in the country!"
"Can I read it?' Alice asks. "Sure," Bob says, "just as soon as our legal team is done with it. They're almost through the first chapter." He pauses, then continues. "And can you believe that sales guy Mike? He has the same year Porsche as me. I mean, what are the odds?"

"Do you use multi-sig?", Alice asks. "Absolutely!" Bob replies. "All our engineers are fully trained in multi-sig. Whenever we want to set up a new wallet, we generate 2 separate keys in an air-gapped process and store them in this proprietary system here. Look, it even requires the biometric signature from one of our team members to initiate any withdrawal." He demonstrates by pressing his thumb into the display. "We use a third-party cloud validation API to match the thumbprint and authorize each withdrawal. The keys are also backed up daily to an off-site third-party."
"Wow that's really impressive," Alice says, "but what if we need access for a withdrawal outside of office hours?" "Well that's no issue", Bob says, "just send us an email, call, or text message and we always have someone on staff to help out. Just another part of our strong commitment to all our customers!"

"What about Proof of Reserve?", Alice asks. "Of course", Bob replies, "though rather than publish any blockchain addresses or signed transaction, for privacy we just do a SHA256 refactoring of the inverse hash modulus for each UTXO nonce and combine the smart contract coefficient consensus in our hyperledger lightning node. But it's really simple to use." He pushes a button and a large green checkmark appears on a screen. "See - the algorithm ran through and reserves are proven."
"Wow", Alice says, "you really know your stuff! And that is easy to use! What about fiat balances?" "Yeah, we have an auditor too", Bob replies, "Been using him for a long time so we have quite a strong relationship going! We have special books we give him every year and he's very efficient! Checks the fiat, crypto, and everything all at once!"

"We used to have a nice offline multi-sig setup we've been using without issue for the past 5 years, but I think we'll move all our funds over to your facility," Alice says. "Awesome", Bob replies, "Thanks so much! This is perfect timing too - my Porsche got a dent on it this morning. We have the paperwork right over here." "Great!", Alice replies.
And with that, Alice gets out her pen and Bob gets the contract. "Don't worry", he says, "you can take your crypto-assets back anytime you like - just subject to our cancellation policy. Our annual management fees are also super low and we don't adjust them often".

How many holes have to exist for your funds to get stolen?
Just one.

Why are we taking a powerful offline multi-sig setup, widely used globally in hundreds of different/lacking regulatory environments with 0 breaches to date, and circumventing it by a demonstrably weak third party layer? And paying a great expense to do so?
If you go through the list of breaches in the past 2 years to highly credible organizations, you go through the list of major corporate frauds (only the ones we know about), you go through the list of all the times platforms have lost funds, you go through the list of times and ways that people have lost their crypto from identity theft, hot wallet exploits, extortion, etc... and then you go through this custodian with a fine-tooth comb and truly believe they have value to add far beyond what you could, sticking your funds in a wallet (or set of wallets) they control exclusively is the absolute worst possible way to take advantage of that security.

The best way to add security for crypto-assets is to make a stronger multi-sig. With one custodian, what you are doing is giving them your cryptocurrency and hoping they're honest, competent, and flawlessly secure. It's no different than storing it on a really secure exchange. Maybe the insurance will cover you. Didn't work for Bitpay in 2015. Didn't work for Yapizon in 2017. Insurance has never paid a claim in the entire history of cryptocurrency. But maybe you'll get lucky. Maybe your exact scenario will buck the trend and be what they're willing to cover. After the large deductible and hopefully without a long and expensive court battle.

And you want to advertise this increase in risk, the lapse of judgement, an accident waiting to happen, as though it's some kind of benefit to customers ("Free institutional-grade storage for your digital assets.")? And then some people are writing to the OSC that custodians should be mandatory for all funds on every exchange platform? That this somehow will make Canadians as a whole more secure or better protected compared with standard air-gapped multi-sig? On what planet?

Most of the problems in Canada stemmed from one thing - a lack of transparency. If Canadians had known what a joke Quadriga was - it wouldn't have grown to lose $400m from hard-working Canadians from coast to coast to coast. And Gerald Cotten would be in jail, not wherever he is now (at best, rotting peacefully). EZ-BTC and mister Dave Smilie would have been a tiny little scam to his friends, not a multi-million dollar fraud. Einstein would have got their act together or been shut down BEFORE losing millions and millions more in people's funds generously donated to criminals. MapleChange wouldn't have even been a thing. And maybe we'd know a little more about CoinTradeNewNote - like how much was lost in there. Almost all of the major losses with cryptocurrency exchanges involve deception with unbacked funds.
So it's great to see transparency reports from BitBuy and ShakePay where someone independently verified the backing. The only thing we don't have is:
It's not complicated to validate cryptocurrency assets. They need to exist, they need to be spendable, and they need to cover the total balances. There are plenty of credible people and firms across the country that have the capacity to reasonably perform this validation. Having more frequent checks by different, independent, parties who publish transparent reports is far more valuable than an annual check by a single "more credible/official" party who does the exact same basic checks and may or may not publish anything. Here's an example set of requirements that could be mandated:
There are ways to structure audits such that neither crypto assets nor customer information are ever put at risk, and both can still be properly validated and publicly verifiable. There are also ways to structure audits such that they are completely reasonable for small platforms and don't inhibit innovation in any way. By making the process as reasonable as possible, we can completely eliminate any reason/excuse that an honest platform would have for not being audited. That is arguable far more important than any incremental improvement we might get from mandating "the best of the best" accountants. Right now we have nothing mandated and tons of Canadians using offshore exchanges with no oversight whatsoever.

Transparency does not prove crypto assets are safe. CoinTradeNewNote, Flexcoin ($600k), and Canadian Bitcoins ($100k) are examples where crypto-assets were breached from platforms in Canada. All of them were online wallets and used no multi-sig as far as any records show. This is consistent with what we see globally - air-gapped multi-sig wallets have an impeccable record, while other schemes tend to suffer breach after breach. We don't actually know how much CoinTrader lost because there was no visibility. Rather than publishing details of what happened, the co-founder of CoinTrader silently moved on to found another platform - the "most trusted way to buy and sell crypto" - a site that has no information whatsoever (that I could find) on the storage practices and a FAQ advising that “[t]rading cryptocurrency is completely safe” and that having your own wallet is “entirely up to you! You can certainly keep cryptocurrency, or fiat, or both, on the app.” Doesn't sound like much was learned here, which is really sad to see.
It's not that complicated or unreasonable to set up a proper hardware wallet. Multi-sig can be learned in a single course. Something the equivalent complexity of a driver's license test could prevent all the cold storage exploits we've seen to date - even globally. Platform operators have a key advantage in detecting and preventing fraud - they know their customers far better than any custodian ever would. The best job that custodians can do is to find high integrity individuals and train them to form even better wallet signatories. Rather than mandating that all platforms expose themselves to arbitrary third party risks, regulations should center around ensuring that all signatories are background-checked, properly trained, and using proper procedures. We also need to make sure that signatories are empowered with rights and responsibilities to reject and report fraud. They need to know that they can safely challenge and delay a transaction - even if it turns out they made a mistake. We need to have an environment where mistakes are brought to the surface and dealt with. Not one where firms and people feel the need to hide what happened. In addition to a knowledge-based test, an auditor can privately interview each signatory to make sure they're not in coercive situations, and we should make sure they can freely and anonymously report any issues without threat of retaliation.
A proper multi-sig has each signature held by a separate person and is governed by policies and mutual decisions instead of a hierarchy. It includes at least one redundant signature. For best results, 3of4, 3of5, 3of6, 4of5, 4of6, 4of7, 5of6, or 5of7.

History has demonstrated over and over again the risk of hot wallets even to highly credible organizations. Nonetheless, many platforms have hot wallets for convenience. While such losses are generally compensated by platforms without issue (for example Poloniex, Bitstamp, Bitfinex, Gatecoin, Coincheck, Bithumb, Zaif, CoinBene, Binance, Bitrue, Bitpoint, Upbit, VinDAX, and now KuCoin), the public tends to focus more on cases that didn't end well. Regardless of what systems are employed, there is always some level of risk. For that reason, most members of the public would prefer to see third party insurance.
Rather than trying to convince third party profit-seekers to provide comprehensive insurance and then relying on an expensive and slow legal system to enforce against whatever legal loopholes they manage to find each and every time something goes wrong, insurance could be run through multiple exchange operators and regulators, with the shared interest of having a reputable industry, keeping costs down, and taking care of Canadians. For example, a 4 of 7 multi-sig insurance fund held between 5 independent exchange operators and 2 regulatory bodies. All Canadian exchanges could pay premiums at a set rate based on their needed coverage, with a higher price paid for hot wallet coverage (anything not an air-gapped multi-sig cold wallet). Such a model would be much cheaper to manage, offer better coverage, and be much more reliable to payout when needed. The kind of coverage you could have under this model is unheard of. You could even create something like the CDIC to protect Canadians who get their trading accounts hacked if they can sufficiently prove the loss is legitimate. In cases of fraud, gross negligence, or insolvency, the fund can be used to pay affected users directly (utilizing the last transparent balance report in the worst case), something which private insurance would never touch. While it's recommended to have official policies for coverage, a model where members vote would fully cover edge cases. (Could be similar to the Supreme Court where justices vote based on case law.)
Such a model could fully protect all Canadians across all platforms. You can have a fiat coverage governed by legal agreements, and crypto-asset coverage governed by both multi-sig and legal agreements. It could be practical, affordable, and inclusive.

Now, we are at a crossroads. We can happily give up our freedom, our innovation, and our money. We can pay hefty expenses to auditors, lawyers, and regulators year after year (and make no mistake - this cost will grow to many millions or even billions as the industry grows - and it will be borne by all Canadians on every platform because platforms are not going to eat up these costs at a loss). We can make it nearly impossible for any new platform to enter the marketplace, forcing Canadians to use the same stagnant platforms year after year. We can centralize and consolidate the entire industry into 2 or 3 big players and have everyone else fail (possibly to heavy losses of users of those platforms). And when a flawed security model doesn't work and gets breached, we can make it even more complicated with even more people in suits making big money doing the job that blockchain was supposed to do in the first place. We can build a system which is so intertwined and dependent on big government, traditional finance, and central bankers that it's future depends entirely on that of the fiat system, of fractional banking, and of government bail-outs. If we choose this path, as history has shown us over and over again, we can not go back, save for revolution. Our children and grandchildren will still be paying the consequences of what we decided today.
Or, we can find solutions that work. We can maintain an open and innovative environment while making the adjustments we need to make to fully protect Canadian investors and cryptocurrency users, giving easy and affordable access to cryptocurrency for all Canadians on the platform of their choice, and creating an environment in which entrepreneurs and problem solvers can bring those solutions forward easily. None of the above precludes innovation in any way, or adds any unreasonable cost - and these three policies would demonstrably eliminate or resolve all 109 historic cases as studied here - that's every single case researched so far going back to 2011. It includes every loss that was studied so far not just in Canada but globally as well.
Unfortunately, finding answers is the least challenging part. Far more challenging is to get platform operators and regulators to agree on anything. My last post got no response whatsoever, and while the OSC has told me they're happy for industry feedback, I believe my opinion alone is fairly meaningless. This takes the whole community working together to solve. So please let me know your thoughts. Please take the time to upvote and share this with people. Please - let's get this solved and not leave it up to other people to do.

Facts/background/sources (skip if you like):



Thoughts?
submitted by azoundria2 to QuadrigaInitiative [link] [comments]

First year has came, Good news are reported frequently:Has Blockchain industry reach the watershed?

First year has came, Good news are reported frequently:Has Blockchain industry reach the watershed?
In 2020, It is a disaster year for most industries and regions. However, when we are facing catastrophe,opportunities are emerging accordingly.In global widespread depression period, there is an industry quietly emerging , that is Blockchain industry.
From the beginning of this year, countries around the globe are accelerating the researching speed for Blockchain technology , many world banks are starting the research on lawful digital currency , many advantageous policies are announced one after another. Therefore, this year is also called " First Year Of Blockchain Industries".
As a matter of fact, There was a warning for rising status of Blockchain Industry in the previous periods. In recent years, Internet Blockchain services companies are all increasing their ranking among Global Blockchain industries.Currently,Top companies around the globe are Google, Amazon from the US;Alibaba , JingDong from China.

https://preview.redd.it/rx04bzmanev51.jpg?width=600&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=9c7911a0c6dfdb8e7c131eea8c499ff8b3b4034b
Current Global Blockchain corporations locations are mainly focus in China and Europe,America. There are about 80% of Global Blockchain industries located in America and China. Besides Europe and America,United Nations World Food Programme has started the exploration and applications processes for Blockchain technique in the 2015.
From the current situation, although good news within the industry are annouced constantly, there is still a path to real Blockchain outbreak period; The reasons for preventing the Blockchain technique grounded progress are because of the following two reasons:
First , the Birth of Blockchain technique is considering to be the layer technique for Bitcoins, most projects are hard to separte Digital currency and Blockchain in the Blockchain technique researching progress, which is the reason to cause popularizing image for Blockchain technique is still digital currency for most people and not the real technique with useful value.This is not positive trending for project's development and grounded process. Currently, very popularized DEFI fields are also facing entity grounded problems.
In 2018 January, United nation "weather chain alliance" is planning to build a transparent system for climate data, carbon emission data and carbon trade data, distributed accountbook technique is elimating the possibility of influence of political changes for Climate data. Before that, UN used to release Ethereum Blockchain tryout project, which was to provide humanitarian aid for Syria refugee.
Super Public chain AITD Blockchain is positively facilitating DeFi and Dentralized progresses. The emergence of these two applications are enabling the world to observe more possibilities for Blockchain Technique and also allowing us to start thinking " What is the real Blockchain Future.
Second, Each country's Blockchain technique competition is almost coming to a fervorization period, At the same time, Blockchain industry good news are annoucing constantly. Currently, most Blockchain project are covering small area, single scenario application mode,Blockchain pojects which can achieve open source and wide range popularization is rare and precious.
In global Blockchain market seize competition, various internet leaders are participating in seizing the resources, bringing feared emotions to the industries . Such as famous Facebook social media, Facebook social communication platform possessed enormous users amounts. In 2019, Facebook published Libra White Paper, this move is causing a great disturbance within the industry.
From there we can say that the competition between Blockchain projects are the competition between user and consensus. The current situation is that industry face is strong market seizing competition trending for each country's Blockchain industry's development and exploration. Any two countries are trying to control the first position for digital economy era, but not to promote Blockchain technique value grounded process around the globe.

https://preview.redd.it/ofmt59nfnev51.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=d6f8f5363e1dcd69cf99075375b1f09a2c3d2003
Even for the lawful digital currencies which are currently under researching and development progresses, are also independently researching and developing by each countries' Bank, which is easy to form isolated island. This seizing phenomenon is not coordinating with Blockchain spirits. If huge internet companies which have enormous users amount are starting to join the scramble competition, it is definitely going to form new competitions.
Blockchain spirit is Trust, Open sources, Decentralization, current phenomenon is not coordinating with Blockchain spirits . AITD public chain may provide assistance for Blockchain technique grounded progresses with stronger financial application backgrounds and rich ecosystem environment.
Therefore, The real project which can promote the Blockchain technique grounded progress and perform as "watershed functions"(means the new direction) for industry development progress should be breaking the country boundary, breaking industry barrier, serving global, providing safe and reliable grounded ecosystem , but the generation of the project is not for single country or industry resources seizing process.
submitted by AITDBlockchai to u/AITDBlockchai [link] [comments]

Can Blockchain Gaming Drive Cryptocurrency Adoption?

Can Blockchain Gaming Drive Cryptocurrency Adoption?
The gaming industry, with its approximately 2.5 billion gamers worldwide, is a lucrative target and an immense field of application for blockchain itself, Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies that could no doubt give a mighty push toward taking and making the technology mainstream. Honestly, this is not quite a news as the efforts to establish cryptocurrencies in the entertainment sector have gone a long way, with varying degrees of success.
by StealthEX
What they were, how it fared, and where things are going now – these questions deserve their own inquiry. So let’s take a look at how gaming facilitates cryptocurrency adoption, in what ways, and whether exposing the blockchain tech to a user base of a third of the world’s population would help oil the wheels of this sportster in a major way and ultimately cause a tectonic shift in the gaming industry itself.

A Little Bit of History

As Bitcoin kicked off in late 2008, with its first transaction hitting, or effectively starting, the blockchain in early January of 2009, it had taken well over two years till the cryptocurrency got involved in online gambling. It was the now-defunct mobile poker platform, Switchpoker, a developer of an online poker room that started to accept Bitcoin as a deposit and payment option. You can still find a topic on Bitcointalk.org about this news dated back to November 23, 2011.
In April 2012, Erik Voorhees, an American entrepreneur and early Bitcoin adopter, founded Satoshi Dice, arguably the oldest online cryptocasino on the block, which is still pretty much alive today, although Voorhees sold it in a year. What makes it truly intriguing is the fact that during its early years the casino was generating half of all the transactions on the Bitcoin network. In short, online gambling was critically important in Bitcoin’s infancy years as it helped promote cryptocurrency awareness that led to future growth and expansion into other areas.
Some folks are certainly going to argue that gambling is not the same thing as gaming. The commonly accepted view is that gaming is based on skill while gambling on chance. We won’t debate over this point. However, as every poker player knows, the outcome of a poker game depends not only on luck, but also on skill and expertise. Put simply, there are large gray areas and overlaps. All things considered, our exposition would be missing a big chunk of significant history without giving due credit to gambling and how it helped Bitcoin adoption.
Now that online gambling is off our chest, we can safely turn to gaming as it is understood in the industry, and look at how it helped the blockchain space. One of the first uses of Bitcoin in a major game that we are aware of started in 2014 with the launch of BitQuest, a Minecraft server that used Bitcoin for in-game transactions. Within the gaming environment you could buy valuable in-game stuff from other users with the so-called bits, small fractions of a Bitcoin, and earn them by completing in-game tasks or challenges like killing local monsters.
BitQuest closed the server in summer of 2019, and its brand name now belongs to a different entity not involved with gaming, but it still produced an impact. In essence, this effort successfully demonstrated how a cryptocurrency, in this case Bitcoin, can be used in lieu of a native in-game currency that players can earn, buy and spend as well as withdraw. This has serious implications for two main reasons. First, Bitcoin, unlike any other purely in-game currency, has uses outside the game and its ecosystem, and, second, its supply cannot be manipulated by the game developers, which makes the game by far more fair and square.
Needless to say, the example that BitQuest had set encouraged other market participants to look into Bitcoin as an alternative option for in-game currencies. Another popular Minecraft server, PlayMC, also introduced Bitcoin into its world in 2015, but ceased the operation just two years later. There were a few other servers experimenting with altcoins, more specifically, Dogecoin, but most of them disappeared from the scene shortly thereafter, failing to attract enough die-hard Minecraft fans.

What Has Changed?

With the arrival of smart contract-enabled blockchains such as Ethereum, EOS and TRON, the phrase “blockchain gaming” has taken on a more literal meaning as these blockchains allow games to be designed and played entirely on-chain in much the same manner trades are made on a decentralized exchange. While TRON stands for “The Real-time Operating system Nucleus”, there is an obvious reference to a once popular arcade game based on a titular 1982 science fiction film that ultimately garnered a cult following.
CryptoKitties is likely the most popular game ever released in the Ethereum ecosystem and probably in the whole crypto space so far. Its test version was made available on October 19, 2017, and it was an instant success. By the end of 2017 over 200,000 people signed up for the game, spending over $20 million in Ether. We won’t delve into its “gameplay” as it is beyond the scope of this article, and most certainly you are well familiar with it anyway. But what we absolutely should write about is the effect it made and the repercussions it produced.
It could be said that CryptoKitties was to the Ethereum blockchain what Satoshi Dice had been to Bitcoin in the early days of crypto. At the peak of its popularity the game reportedly accounted for 20-25% of all Ethereum’s traffic that clogged the entire Ethereum network, with transaction fees skyrocketing. No wonder lots of people got pissed off with this turn of events. However, despite all the rage and fury, CryptoKitties amply demonstrated what a success means in the blockchain gaming field, how it looks and feels in practice.
It is hard to estimate how much CryptoKitties contributed to cryptocurrency adoption. But given that a few hundred thousand people got involved in this game alone and many more with dozens of blockchain games that it has spawned, like Etherbots, Gods Unchained, The Six Dragons, etc, this indisputable triumph surely counts as a massive contribution by any definition or metric. Moreover, it also revealed the weaknesses of the contemporary blockchain solutions and what exactly should be done to overcome them.
Evolution never goes linearly. In fact, it generally doesn’t go in curves, circles, or zig zags, either. It always moves along very diverse routes, directions and entire dimensions like plants and animals, viruses and bacteria, and, well, dinosaurs and mammals. The evolution of gaming in crypto space is no different. СryptoKitties and other games share essentially the same tech under the hood – building games on some advanced general-purpose blockchain such as Ethereum. But it is not the only front that crypto gaming has been advancing on, nor is it the only way to introduce gaming to cryptocurrencies, and vice versa.
A more recent approach is based on designing either a standalone cryptocurrency or a token on a smart contract-enabled blockchain to be used across many games that support it as an in-game currency. As a result, gamers can enjoy true ownership of their in-game assets (the so-called non-fungible tokens, or NFTs), safe item trading outside the game, and cross-game compatibility. This path has been taken by such projects as Enjin (ENJ), GAME Credits (GAME), Decentraland (MANA), WAX (WAXP) and others, with their respective cryptocurrencies fueling a range of games.
A somewhat different avenue is taken by Funfair (FUN), Chromia (CHR) and Lucid Sight, which are offering platforms that blockchain games can be built on. Thus, Lucid Sight’s Scarcity Engine is focused more on game creators than end users, that is to say, gamers, allowing developers to integrate blockchain into their games. It aims to obliterate the difference between blockchain-based games and traditional gaming platforms. Funfair, on the other hand, leans more toward creating custom-built blockchain casinos, with its FUN token as a casino “chip”. So much for no more gambling, huh.
Our account of events would be incomplete if we didn’t mention yet another attempt to make use of Minecraft for the purpose of introducing cryptocurrencies to the gaming public. This time, a new Minecraft mod called SatoshiQuest has emerged. To participate in it, the gamers pay $1 in Bitcoin and get one in-game life. The pooled coins make up the loot, and the challenge is to find a minimum of 400 key fragments into which the keys to the Bitcoin wallet containing the prize are divided. And who said that evolution doesn’t loop?

Challenges and Future Prospects

The knockout popularity of СryptoKitties has clearly shown the scale of cryptocurrency mass adoption that blockchain gaming can trigger. As the game developers themselves put it, their “goal is to drive mainstream adoption of blockchain technology”. They believe that “the technology has immense benefits for consumers, but for those benefits to be realized, it needs to be experienced to be understood”. Speaking more broadly, as more people start using cryptocurrencies for gaming, they may eventually become interested in using their coins for purposes other than playing one game or another.
With that said, it is now as clear that there are two main barriers on the way there. The first is the limitations of the blockchain tech itself that essentially limits blockchain gaming to NFTs, in-game currencies, streamlined payments, and similar stuff. This is mostly a technical challenge anyway, and we could realistically expect it to be solved sooner or later. The other issue is applicable to the gaming industry as a whole. People en masse would only play games that are truly engaging and immersive, technical issues aside.
So the bottom line is that we need the convergence of these two vectors to make blockchain a dominating force in the gaming industry. First, the blockchain tech should have the capacity for running multiplayer games that major video game developers like Blizzard, Valve and Ubisoft produce, no trade-offs here. Then, we actually need the games like Warcraft, Counter-Strike or Far Cry that can be played on blockchain, to make it matter. Only after we get there, the gaming industry will likely become a primary driver behind cryptocurrency adoption.
What are your thoughts on how gaming facilitates cryptocurrency adoption? Tell us your ideas in the comments below.
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The views and opinions expressed here are solely those of the author. Every investment and trading move involves risk. You should conduct your own research when making a decision.
Original article was posted on https://stealthex.io/blog/2020/09/22/can-blockchain-gaming-drive-cryptocurrency-adoption/
submitted by Stealthex_io to StealthEX [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: programming top posts from 2019-10-22 to 2020-10-21 06:41 PDT

Period: 364.67 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 180545
Rate (per day) 2.74 491.84
Unique Redditors 629 34951
Combined Score 1178903 2688497

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 47468 points, 49 submissions: iamkeyur
    1. One Guy Ruined Hacktoberfest 2020 (3039 points, 584 comments)
    2. AWS forked my project and launched it as its own service (2956 points, 810 comments)
    3. Privacy analysis of Tiktok’s app and website (2858 points, 234 comments)
    4. 98.css – design system for building faithful recreations of Windows 98 UIs (2781 points, 318 comments)
    5. Microsoft demos language model that writes code based on signature and comment (2621 points, 614 comments)
    6. Why does HTML think “chucknorris” is a color? (2565 points, 531 comments)
    7. Windows 95 UI Design (2309 points, 665 comments)
    8. The Linux codebase has over 3k TODO comments, many from over a decade ago (2119 points, 369 comments)
    9. eBay is port scanning visitors to their website (1829 points, 236 comments)
    10. Using const/let instead of var can make JavaScript code run 10× slower in Webkit (1814 points, 525 comments)
  2. 44853 points, 28 submissions: speckz
    1. From August, Chrome will start blocking ads that consume 4MB of network data, 15 seconds of CPU usage in any 30 second period, or 60 seconds of total CPU usage (8434 points, 590 comments)
    2. How To Spot Toxic Software Jobs From Their Descriptions (6246 points, 1281 comments)
    3. A Facebook crawler was making 7M requests per day to my stupid website (2662 points, 426 comments)
    4. Apple, Your Developer Documentation is Garbage (2128 points, 432 comments)
    5. The code I’m still ashamed of (2016) (2105 points, 429 comments)
    6. Slack Is Fumbling Developers And The Rise Of Developer Discords (2095 points, 811 comments)
    7. The Chromium project finds that around 70% of our serious security bugs are memory safety problems. Our next major project is to prevent such bugs at source. (1959 points, 418 comments)
    8. Advice to Myself When Starting Out as a Software Developer (1934 points, 257 comments)
    9. Software patents are another kind of disease (1893 points, 419 comments)
    10. My favourite Git commit (1772 points, 206 comments)
  3. 35237 points, 28 submissions: whackri
    1. It is perfectly OK to only code at work, you can have a life too (6765 points, 756 comments)
    2. Kernighan's Law - Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place. Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by definition, not smart enough to debug it. (5171 points, 437 comments)
    3. The entire Apollo 11 computer code that helped get us to the Moon is available on github. (3841 points, 433 comments)
    4. Raytracing - in Excel! (2478 points, 168 comments)
    5. Writing userspace USB drivers for abandoned devices (1689 points, 84 comments)
    6. Drum Machine in Excel (1609 points, 60 comments)
    7. fork() can fail: this is important (1591 points, 264 comments)
    8. Learn how computers add numbers and build a 4 bit adder circuit (1548 points, 66 comments)
    9. Heroes Of Might And Magic III engine written from scratch (open source, playable) (1453 points, 84 comments)
    10. Apollo Guidance Computer: Restoring the computer that put man on the Moon (1277 points, 47 comments)
  4. 14588 points, 11 submissions: pimterry
    1. I'm a software engineer going blind, how should I prepare? (4237 points, 351 comments)
    2. The 2038 problem is already affecting some systems (1988 points, 518 comments)
    3. TLDR pages: Simplified, community-driven man pages (1897 points, 182 comments)
    4. JetBrains Mono: A Typeface for Developers (1728 points, 456 comments)
    5. BlurHash: extremely compact representations of image placeholders (930 points, 159 comments)
    6. Let's Destroy C (855 points, 290 comments)
    7. Shared Cache is Going Away (833 points, 192 comments)
    8. XML is almost always misused (766 points, 538 comments)
    9. Wireshark has a new packet diagram view (688 points, 24 comments)
    10. fork() can fail: this is important (460 points, 299 comments)
  5. 14578 points, 9 submissions: magenta_placenta
    1. Trello handed over user's personal account to user's previous company (2962 points, 489 comments)
    2. Feds: IBM did discriminate against older workers in making layoffs - “Analysis shows it was primarily older workers (85.85%) in the total potential pool of those considered for layoff,” the EEOC wrote (2809 points, 509 comments)
    3. Stripe Workers Who Relocate Get $20,000 Bonus and a Pay Cut - Stripe Inc. plans to make a one-time payment of $20,000 to employees who opt to move out of San Francisco, New York or Seattle, but also cut their base salary by as much as 10% (2765 points, 989 comments)
    4. US court fully legalized website scraping and technically prohibited it - On September 9, the U.S. 9th circuit court of Appeals ruled that web scraping public sites does not violate the CFAA (Computer Fraud and Abuse Act) (2014 points, 327 comments)
    5. I Suspect many Task Deadlines are Designed to Force Engineers to Work for Free (1999 points, 553 comments)
    6. Intent to Deprecate and Freeze: The User-Agent string (1012 points, 271 comments)
    7. Contractor admits planting logic bombs in his software to ensure he’d get new work (399 points, 182 comments)
    8. AlphaStar: Grandmaster level in StarCraft II using multi-agent reinforcement learning (396 points, 97 comments)
    9. Half of the websites using WebAssembly use it for malicious purposes - WebAssembly not that popular: Only 1,639 sites of the Top 1 Million use WebAssembly (222 points, 133 comments)
  6. 13750 points, 3 submissions: pedrovhb
    1. Bubble sort visualization (7218 points, 276 comments)
    2. Breadth-first search visualization (3874 points, 96 comments)
    3. Selection sort visualization (2658 points, 80 comments)
  7. 11833 points, 1 submission: flaming_bird
    1. 20GB leak of Intel data: whole Git repositories, dev tools, backdoor mentions in source code (11833 points, 956 comments)
  8. 11208 points, 10 submissions: PowerOfLove1985
    1. No cookie consent walls — and no, scrolling isn’t consent, says EU data protection body (5975 points, 890 comments)
    2. Redesigning uBlock Origin (1184 points, 162 comments)
    3. Playing Around With The Fuchsia Operating System (696 points, 164 comments)
    4. Microsoft's underwater data centre resurfaces after two years (623 points, 199 comments)
    5. Microsoft Paint/Paintbrush in Javascript (490 points, 58 comments)
    6. GitHub shuts off access to Aurelia repository, citing trade sanctions (478 points, 81 comments)
    7. How 3D Game Rendering Works: Texturing (475 points, 22 comments)
    8. Simdjson: Parsing Gigabytes of JSON per Second (441 points, 90 comments)
    9. How 1500 bytes became the MTU of the internet (435 points, 60 comments)
    10. It’s OK for your open source library to be a bit shitty (411 points, 130 comments)
  9. 10635 points, 8 submissions: michalg82
    1. Turning animations to 60fps using AI (3449 points, 234 comments)
    2. Bug #1463112 “Cat sitting on keyboard crashes lightdm” (3150 points, 143 comments)
    3. Heroes Of Might And Magic III engine written from scratch (open source, playable) (1431 points, 172 comments)
    4. Vulkan is coming to Raspberry Pi: first triangle - Raspberry Pi (1318 points, 66 comments)
    5. An EPYC trip to Rome: AMD is Cloudflare's 10th-generation Edge server CPU (431 points, 60 comments)
    6. Microsoft cancels GDC 2020 presence due to coronavirus concerns (Following Sony, Facebook, Kojima Productions, Epic Games, Unity, and more) (371 points, 52 comments)
    7. Moving from reCAPTCHA to hCaptcha - The Cloudflare Blog (278 points, 71 comments)
    8. How much of a genius-level move was using binary space partitioning in Doom? (207 points, 109 comments)
  10. 10106 points, 10 submissions: SerenityOS
    1. Someone suggested I should host my website on my own OS. For that we'll need a web server, so here's me building a basic web server in C++ for SerenityOS! (2269 points, 149 comments)
    2. I've been learning about OS security lately. Here's me making a local root exploit for SerenityOS, and then fixing the kernel bugs that made it possible! (1372 points, 87 comments)
    3. SerenityOS was hacked in a 36c3 CTF! (Exploit and write-up) (1236 points, 40 comments)
    4. One week ago, I started building a JavaScript engine for SerenityOS. Here’s me integrating it with the web browser and adding some simple API’s like alert()! (1169 points, 63 comments)
    5. Implementing macOS-style "purgeable memory" in my kernel. This technique is amazing and helps apps be better memory usage citizens! (1131 points, 113 comments)
    6. SerenityOS: The second year (900 points, 101 comments)
    7. Using my own C++ IDE to make a little program for decorating my webcam frame (571 points, 33 comments)
    8. This morning I ported git to SerenityOS. It took about an hour and some hacks, but it works! :D (547 points, 64 comments)
    9. Smarter C/C++ inlining with attribute((flatten)) (521 points, 118 comments)
    10. Introduction to SerenityOS GUI programming (390 points, 45 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. XANi_ (10753 points, 821 comments)
  2. dnew (7513 points, 641 comments)
  3. drysart (7479 points, 202 comments)
  4. MuonManLaserJab (6666 points, 233 comments)
  5. SanityInAnarchy (6331 points, 350 comments)
  6. AngularBeginner (6215 points, 59 comments)
  7. SerenityOS (5627 points, 128 comments)
  8. chucker23n (5465 points, 370 comments)
  9. IshKebab (4898 points, 393 comments)
  10. L3tum (4857 points, 199 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. 20GB leak of Intel data: whole Git repositories, dev tools, backdoor mentions in source code by flaming_bird (11833 points, 956 comments)
  2. hentAI: Detecting and removing censors with Deep Learning and Image Segmentation by 7cmStrangler (9621 points, 395 comments)
  3. US Politicians Want to Ban End-to-End Encryption by CarrotRobber (9427 points, 523 comments)
  4. From August, Chrome will start blocking ads that consume 4MB of network data, 15 seconds of CPU usage in any 30 second period, or 60 seconds of total CPU usage by speckz (8434 points, 590 comments)
  5. Mozilla: The Greatest Tech Company Left Behind by matthewpmacdonald (7566 points, 1087 comments)
  6. Bubble sort visualization by pedrovhb (7218 points, 276 comments)
  7. During lockdown my wife has been suffering mentally from pressure to stay at her desk 100% of the time otherwise after a few minutes her laptop locks and she is recorded as inactive. I wrote this small app to help her escape her desk by periodically moving the cursor. Hopefully it can help others. by silitbang6000 (7193 points, 855 comments)
  8. It is perfectly OK to only code at work, you can have a life too by whackri (6765 points, 756 comments)
  9. Blockchain, the amazing solution for almost nothing by imogenchampagne (6725 points, 1561 comments)
  10. Blockchain, the amazing solution for almost nothing by jessefrederik (6524 points, 1572 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 2975 points: deleted's comment in hentAI: Detecting and removing censors with Deep Learning and Image Segmentation
  2. 2772 points: I_DONT_LIE_MUCH's comment in 20GB leak of Intel data: whole Git repositories, dev tools, backdoor mentions in source code
  3. 2485 points: api's comment in Stripe Workers Who Relocate Get $20,000 Bonus and a Pay Cut - Stripe Inc. plans to make a one-time payment of $20,000 to employees who opt to move out of San Francisco, New York or Seattle, but also cut their base salary by as much as 10%
  4. 2484 points: a_false_vacuum's comment in Stack Overflow lays off 15%
  5. 2464 points: iloveparagon's comment in Google engineer breaks down the problems he uses when doing technical interviews. Lots of advice on algorithms and programming.
  6. 2384 points: why_not_both_bot's comment in During lockdown my wife has been suffering mentally from pressure to stay at her desk 100% of the time otherwise after a few minutes her laptop locks and she is recorded as inactive. I wrote this small app to help her escape her desk by periodically moving the cursor. Hopefully it can help others.
  7. 2293 points: ThatInternetGuy's comment in Iranian Maintainer refuses to merge code from Israeli Developer. Cites Iranian regulations.
  8. 2268 points: xequae's comment in I'm a software engineer going blind, how should I prepare?
  9. 2228 points: turniphat's comment in AWS forked my project and launched it as its own service
  10. 2149 points: Rami-Slicer's comment in 20GB leak of Intel data: whole Git repositories, dev tools, backdoor mentions in source code
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by flpezet to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

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